Skip to Content

USD Abroad

Drop Shadow
Programs : Brochure
This page is the brochure for your selected program. You can view the provided information for this program on this page and click on the available buttons for additional options.
England: London - USD Summer Program (Summer)
London, England (Outgoing Program)
Program Terms: Summer
PROGRAM COST Summer
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Summer 2015 03/04/2015 ** Rolling Admission 06/25/2015 07/18/2015
NOTE: Do not book air travel until you have been enrolled in the program and have received flight instructions.

** Indicates rolling admission application process. Students will be immediately notified of acceptance into this program and be able to complete post-decision materials prior to the term's application deadline.
Fact Sheet:
Language Requirement: None GPA: 0 (in good academic standing)
Professor(s): Dr. Bahar Davary, Dr. Cameron Parker, Dr. Cynthia Caywood, Dr. David Hay, Dr. Derrick Cartwright, Dr. Lori Watson, Dr. Ryan McKeon, Dr. Tara Ceranic, Dr. Terry Bird Internships: No
Disciplines offered: Arts and Sciences - non science, Arts and Sciences - sciences, Business, Core Accomodations: Residence halls
Prerequisite(s): varies Program Advisor: Sabrina Kaiser - skaiser@sandiego.edu
Tuition Remission Eligible Program: Yes
Program Description:

Parliament and London Eye

ENGLAND: London

USD Summer Program
 

PROGRAM LOCATION

London, the theatre mecca, is one of the world's most exciting and visited cities. There are numerous sites to see in this bustling metropolis, but the real joy of London is often found in exploring the lesser-known highways and byways. London is a surprisingly green city, featuring everything from small hidden squares to large public spaces such as Victoria, Hyde, Regents, and St. James' parks.

The University of San Diego's London Summer Program was founded in 2003 by its current faculty directors, Dr. Cythnia Caywood and Dr. David Hay.  The program's mission is to immerse students in the rich and complex culture of London and Britian, and each three unit course makes full use of the London location.  Courses combine classroom study with excursions, field trips, visits to theatres, museums and cathedrals, and guest speakers drawn from the rich world of British scholarly and cultural life.

 
COURSE INFORMATION
 
Courses Offered Professor
ARTH 138/494: The Museum as Artifact Dr. Derrick Cartwright
BIOL 104: Microbes, Plagues and Peoples Dr. Terry Bird
ENGL/THEA 494: London Plays in Production Dr. Cynthia Caywood & Dr. David Hay
ETLW 302D: Business and Society Dr. Tara Ceranic
FINA 402: Investments Dr. Ryan McKeon
MATH 494: Cryptography and War- How Mathematics Saved Democracy  Dr. Cameron Parker
PHIL 330: Ethics Dr. Lori Watson
THRS 315: Islamic Faith and Practice in London Dr. Bahar Davary 

Course Descriptions

ARTH 394: The Museum as Artifact
Professor: Dr. Derrick Cartwright

Pre-requisite: None; some background in Art History will be helpful but not required

This course will survey museum practices in one of the world’s great cultural capitals: London.  Students will explore the growth of public culture in England through the museum as a dynamic civic entity and will gain a complex understanding of these institutions as producers of national identity, economic strength and other highly nuanced (and also contested) meanings.  Thinking critically about the place of these structures in the cultural geography of contemporary England will be another important emphasis of the course. Field trips to a variety of museums—including The Royal Academy of Arts, Tate Gallery and Tate Modern, The British Museum, The Courtauld Gallery, Wallace Collection, Imperial War Museum and Victoria & Albert Museum (to name only a few destinations)—will make up a significant part of the course, as will meetings with art world professionals, classroom discussions and readings devoted to the debates, history and theoretical justifications of museums throughout the world. 

Additional Information:This course fulfills requirements for both major and minor in Art History as well as Fine Arts core.

BIOL 104: Microbes, Plagues and Peoples
Professor: Dr. Terry Bird

Pre-requisite: None

This course will consider the social impact of periodic outbreaks of pestilence that have devastated London throughout its history.  An important cultural and economic center that has long drawn people from across Europe and around the world, London has been vulnerable to sweeping epidemics of infectious disease brought to the shores of the British Isles by these visitors.  We will examine how specific microbes responsible for the bubonic plague, cholera and influenza evolved to cause disease while rapidly spreading through crowded populations.  We will also discuss how physicians treated various types of plague to understand how our perception of disease and the role of microbes have evolved with time.  Our studies will be greatly enhanced by frequent visits to ancient graveyards that contain the remains of plague victims, museums, and to the district of Soho where the last deadly cholera epidemic led scientists to a final acceptance that microbes are indeed responsible for many human scourges. 

Additional Information: This course fulfills the life science core, but is a lecture course only, no lab credit. 

ENGL/THEA 494- London Plays in Production
Professors: Dr. Cynthia Caywood & Dr. David Hay
Pre-requisite: None


Be immersed in the theatre of world’s theatre capital, London!  Enjoy an eight play “season” that can include classical, modern, multi-cultural, and experimental plays and musicals, and visit venues ranging from the Royal National Theatre to abandoned warehouses.  Past productions have included such award winning shows as War Horse, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Sweeney Todd, Waiting for Godot (with Ian McKellan and Patrick Stewart) and the ground-breaking productions of some of the UK’s most innovative troupes, including Propeller (“rock n’ roll meets Shakespeare”) and Punchdrunk (“an experience impossible to shake, even days later”).  The course includes a tour of the Royal National Theatre and a guided walk through Shakespeare’s London. This course fulfills the GE fine arts or literature requirement and major or minor upper division, elective requirements in both English and Theatre Arts.

Additional Information: ENGL fuflills English major requirement and Literature core requirement. THEA fufills Theatre Arts major requirement and the Fine Arts core curriculum requirement.

ETLW 302D- Business and Society
Professor: Dr. Tara Ceranic
Pre-requisite: MGMT 300 + 60 units


This course examines principles of social responsibility, ethics, law, and stakeholder theory as they apply to organizations domestically and abroad. Coverage includes business ethics; individual versus societal interests; labor and employment issues; consumer protection; discrimination and diversity; the natural environment; politics, public policy, and government regulation of business. Particular attention is given to developing moral reasoning skills.

Additional Information: Course is required of all Majors in the SBA; fulfills the D requirement and meets the requirement for the Environmental Studies minor.

FINA 402- Investments
Professor: Dr. Ryan McKeon
Pre-requisite: FINA 300


This course surveys the basic principles and techniques of security and investment analysis. It covers capital markets, stocks, fixed-income portfolios, options, futures contracts and other derivatives. Market analysis methods are examined, and sources of analytical information and their use are studied. The goal is for students to complete the course with a firm understanding of risk and return in the financial markets.  

Additional Information: Course is required for the Finance Majors and Minors and is an elective for Business Administration Majors.

MATH 494- Cryptography & War: How Mathematicians Saved Democracy
Professor: Dr. Cameron Parker
Pre-requisite: Either math 250 or math 160 or permission from the instructor


This course will cover the exciting field of creating and breaking ciphers, from its early war time origins through its current everyday use in the internet age.   Our focus will include number theory, group theory, probability, statistics and information theory.   We will take several excursions around the London area,focusing on World War II and the devastating effects it had on the city and its citizens.  This will remind us that the problems we are working on are not just interesting abstract questions, but were solved by people under great stress at a time when their very way of life was being challenged.  One of the highlights will be a trip to Bletchley Park, where the German codes were first broken using methods and machines that laid the ground work for modern programmable computers.  

Additional Information: This course counts for both the mathematics major and minor.  

PHIL 330- Ethics 
Professor: Dr. Lori Watson
Pre-requisite: None


Two of the most influential moral philosophers in the history of philosophy are: Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill, both of whom are credited with “inventing” utilitarianism, one of the most pervasive views of morality.  Hence, the course begins by studying their works.   Another strand of moral philosophy that developed out of the English context is moral sentimentalism, defended by Adam Smith and David Hume both English philosophers (technically Scottish, but both resided in London and are among the most prominent philosophers in the English-speaking world).  Thus, the course  segues from the early utilitarian thinkers, Mill and Bentham, to the Scottish Enlightenment thinkers Smith and Hume.  As a final portion of the course, we will consider the works of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke, both English philosophers who wrote political treatises during the time of the English civil war and the Glorious Revolution (the installment of William and Mary to the throne).  Hobbes and Locke give us a unique opportunity to examine the political culture of England, English Government and its influences on American Government, including the American Revolution and the founding of the United States.

Additional Information: Fulfills Philosophy major requirement and Ethics core requirement.

THRS 315- Islamic Faith and Practice in London
Professor: Dr. Bahar Davary
Pre-requisite: TBD


Course description coming soon.

Additional Information: Fulfills upper division THRS Core requirement.

 

HOUSING

Students will be living at Queen Mary University in the east end of London. Students will live in flats with 4-6 bedrooms. Each student will have their own bedroom and their own bathroom, and there will be a shared kitchen in each flat.

 
COST
 
For a detailed description of program costs please see the Program Cost in the box at the top of this webpage. 

 

CALENDAR

Coming soon!